Skip to content

Something interesting as I explore this phase of my life…

December 10, 2008

Had this interesting article in my mailbox this morning from Ann+:

Why religious faith silences sex abuse victims?

Sex abuse victims, steeped in strong religious beliefs, experience terrible guilt about their assault but their faith also makes them a helpless pawn in the hands of their abuser.

For instance, Jean-Guy Nadon, professor of theology and religious sciences at the Universite de Montreal, conducted dozens of interviews with women who were sexually abused as children and found the impact of religious beliefs can produce varying reactions.

Nadon interviewed one woman, who as a child was physically and mentally abused by her mother, yet followed the 10 Commandments to the letter.

That meant she could not rebel because she’d been taught to honour her mother and father. Indeed, as a child, the woman felt she had to forgive her mother’s behaviour otherwise she’d go to hell.

Another child, sodomised by her father, also felt she had to forgive him or burn in hell, which her abuser used to his advantage. Another woman, who was raped by a neighbour, was blamed by her mother who claimed the victim provoked the assault.

‘A child’s God can be kidnapped and exploited by an adult, often by the very adult who taught the child about God in the first place,’ observed Nadon. ‘It’s the victims, not the aggressors, who find themselves silenced and overwhelmed by guilt, pain and isolation.’

Kids sometimes deny the existence of a God that doesn’t protect children, while others pray their abuse will end and some pray or get through the ordeal, according to a Montreal release.

The common thread is that religion is an important resilience factor in abused children. Many kids recite the 21st Psalm, the Lord is my Shepherd: ‘Yeah though I walk through the shadow of the valley of death, I shall fear no evil, for Thou art with me.’

Depending on what part of the world they inhabit, Nadon cautions that victims feel differently about their sexual abuse. In the northern US, abuse can weaken a victim’s faith whereas a southerner can strengthen their belief in God following abuse.

Nadon plans to further investigate how religion affects people. He is currently interviewing victims of post-traumatic events such as rape, life-threatening illnesses, accidents or war.

He is collaborating with Denise Couture, a Universite de Montreal professor of theology and religious sciences, as well as researchers from the Netherlands, Belgium and South Africa.

Interesting stuff. The punitive aspects of Christian theology have definitely interfered in my ability to deal effectively with those who have abused me – both as a child and as an adult. Guilt is a terrible and ugly thing…especially when it’s bred into you as a child, whereby it tends toward a lifelong manifestation as a knee jerk reaction, serving no purpose.

What harm and wrong some of the ten commandments have caused.

Advertisements
5 Comments leave one →
  1. December 10, 2008 1:37 pm

    And the Bible in general. Sadly.

  2. December 10, 2008 2:48 pm

    Yes, people have misused religion horribly.

  3. December 10, 2008 5:32 pm

    I could go on and on about this. You spoke of the problem well. Thank you.

  4. December 10, 2008 11:53 pm

    (((((((((((( E ))))))))))))

  5. December 11, 2008 5:57 pm

    Eileen,

    Wow! We truly do have a lot in common. Thanks for this. The 10 commandments gave me fits when I had faith in the literal and inerrant bible. Now, not at all. It’s sad that one has to give up part of one’s faith to be a whole person.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: