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The while away the Friday afternoon 106 Books meme – from Paul (a.)

October 5, 2007

Lifted from Evolving Thoughts
bold = read
italics = partially read

  • Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
  • Anna Karenina
  • Crime and Punishment
  • Catch-22
  • One Hundred Years of Solitude
  • Wuthering Heights
  • The Silmarillion
  • Life of Pi : a novel
  • The Name of the Rose
  • Don Quixote
  • Moby Dick
  • Ulysses
  • Madame Bovary
  • The Odyssey
  • Pride and Prejudice
  • Jane Eyre
  • The Tale of Two Cities
  • The Brothers Karamazov
  • Guns, Germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies
  • War and Peace
  • Vanity Fair
  • The Time Traveler’s Wife
  • The Iliad
  • Emma
  • The Blind Assassin
  • The Kite Runner
  • Mrs. Dalloway
  • Great Expectations
  • American Gods
  • A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
  • Atlas Shrugged
  • Reading Lolita in Tehran : a memoir in books
  • Memoirs of a Geisha
  • Middlesex
  • Quicksilver
  • Wicked : the life and times of the wicked witch of the West
  • The Canterbury tales
  • The Historian : a novel
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
  • Love in the Time of Cholera
  • Brave New World
  • The Fountainhead
  • Foucault’s Pendulum
  • Middlemarch
  • Frankenstein
  • The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Dracula
  • A Clockwork Orange
  • Anansi Boys
  • The Once and Future King
  • The Grapes of Wrath
  • The Poisonwood Bible : a novel
  • 1984
  • Angels & Demons
  • The Inferno
  • The Satanic Verses
  • Sense and Sensibility
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray
  • Mansfield Park
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
  • To the Lighthouse
  • Tess of the D’Urbervilles
  • Oliver Twist
  • Gulliver’s Travels
  • Les Misérables
  • The Corrections
  • The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
  • Dune
  • The Prince
  • The Sound and the Fury
  • Angela’s Ashes : a memoir
  • The God of Small Things
  • A People’s History of the United States : 1492-present
  • Cryptonomicon
  • Neverwhere
  • A Confederacy of Dunces
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything
  • Dubliners
  • The Unbearable Lightness of Being
  • Beloved
  • Slaughterhouse-five
  • The Scarlet Letter
  • Eats, Shoots & Leaves
  • The Mists of Avalon
  • Oryx and Crake : a novel
  • Collapse : how societies choose to fail or succeed
  • Cloud Atlas
  • The Confusion
  • Lolita
  • Persuasion
  • Northanger Abbey
  • The Catcher in the Rye
  • On the Road
  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  • Freakonomics : a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything
  • Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance : an inquiry into values
  • The Aeneid
  • Watership Down
  • Gravity’s Rainbow
  • The Hobbit
  • In Cold Blood : a true account of a multiple murder and its consequences
  • White Teeth
  • Treasure Island
  • David Copperfield
  • The Three Musketeers
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12 Comments leave one →
  1. October 5, 2007 4:27 pm

    May I strongly urge you to read One Hundred Years of Solitude, which I am now reading for the first time? It is way past good; nothing else he (or most anyone else) wrote comes close. OK, maybe a few.

  2. episcopalifem permalink*
    October 5, 2007 4:33 pm

    It is on my list, along with a couple of others on this list – but that book is nearer to the top of my list.

  3. October 5, 2007 4:50 pm

    Thanks – that killed 5 minutes I didn’t have ( here). But it was fun (just scary that there were a couple I hadn’t heard of, no doubt part of the history of the world occuring while I was raising young children).

  4. Paul (A.) permalink
    October 5, 2007 10:01 pm

    Since I started this here:

    · Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell
    · Anna Karenina
    · Crime and Punishment
    · Catch-22
    · One Hundred Years of Solitude
    · Wuthering Heights
    · The Silmarillion
    · Life of Pi : a novel
    · The Name of the Rose
    · Don Quixote
    · Moby Dick
    · Ulysses
    · Madame Bovary
    · The Odyssey
    · Pride and Prejudice
    · Jane Eyre
    · The Tale of Two Cities
    · The Brothers Karamazov
    · Guns, Germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies
    · War and Peace
    · Vanity Fair
    · The Time Traveler’s Wife
    · The Iliad
    · Emma
    · The Blind Assassin
    · The Kite Runner
    · Mrs. Dalloway
    · Great Expectations
    · American Gods
    · A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
    · Atlas Shrugged
    · Reading Lolita in Tehran : a memoir in books
    · Memoirs of a Geisha
    · Middlesex
    · Quicksilver
    · Wicked : the life and times of the wicked witch of the West
    · The Canterbury tales
    · The Historian : a novel
    · A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
    · Love in the Time of Cholera
    · Brave New World
    · The Fountainhead
    · Foucault’s Pendulum
    · Middlemarch
    · Frankenstein
    · The Count of Monte Cristo
    · Dracula
    · A Clockwork Orange
    · Anansi Boys
    · The Once and Future King
    · The Grapes of Wrath
    · The Poisonwood Bible : a novel
    · 1984
    · Angels & Demons
    · The Inferno
    · The Satanic Verses
    · Sense and Sensibility
    · The Picture of Dorian Gray
    · Mansfield Park
    · One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
    · To the Lighthouse
    · Tess of the D’Urbervilles
    · Oliver Twist
    · Gulliver’s Travels
    · Les Misérables
    · The Corrections
    · The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay
    · The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time
    · Dune
    · The Prince
    · The Sound and the Fury
    · Angela’s Ashes : a memoir
    · The God of Small Things
    · A People’s History of the United States : 1492-present
    · Cryptonomicon
    · Neverwhere
    · A Confederacy of Dunces
    · A Short History of Nearly Everything
    · Dubliners
    · The Unbearable Lightness of Being
    · Beloved
    · Slaughterhouse-five
    · The Scarlet Letter
    · Eats, Shoots & Leaves
    · The Mists of Avalon
    · Oryx and Crake : a novel
    · Collapse : how societies choose to fail or succeed
    · Cloud Atlas
    · The Confusion
    · Lolita
    · Persuasion
    · Northanger Abbey
    · The Catcher in the Rye
    · On the Road
    · The Hunchback of Notre Dame
    · Freakonomics : a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything
    · Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance : an inquiry into values
    · The Aeneid
    · Watership Down
    · Gravity’s Rainbow
    · The Hobbit
    · In Cold Blood : a true account of a multiple murder and its consequences
    · White Teeth
    · Treasure Island
    · David Copperfield
    · The Three Musketeers

    And several of the ones I’ve read I’ve read more than once.

  5. Paul (A.) permalink
    October 5, 2007 10:03 pm

    And klady, you’d “eeew” something you haven’t even read part of?

  6. October 6, 2007 8:45 am

    Yes, Paul(A), when it comes to Ayn Rand. I’ve seen too many minds twisted by her writing (not to mention told by others that the plots are boring to boot). Life is short. I think it’s safe enough to say that for me there are far better things to read with what time I have left. Like maybe even the phone book (though I understand that soon it will go out of print).

  7. Paul (A.) permalink
    October 6, 2007 12:55 pm

    There are plots and plots, but the major weakness of her two later novels (the ones on this list) is that too much of the plot is directed toward setting up the lectures by the principal characters. In any event, the best tonic after reading her works (nonfiction as well as the fiction) is to read a biography, preferably that by Barbara Branden.

  8. October 6, 2007 1:39 pm

    Mine tends to non-fiction

    Duiker. Ho Chi Minh

    Nhat Hanh. Living Buddha, Living Christ

    Gaddis. The Landscape of History

    Wilentz. The Rise of American Democracy

    Tutu. No Future Without Forgiveness

    Ricoeur. Symbolism of Evil

    ______. The Rule of Metaphor

    Miles. Image As Insight

    Van Creveld. The Transformation of War

    Lichenstein. Labor’s War at Home.

    Lefebvre. The French Revolution

    Craig. Germany: 1866-1945

    Bloch. Strange Defeat

    Teresa of Avila. Interior Castle

    Meister Eckhardt.

    plus poetry and fiction.

  9. October 7, 2007 4:49 pm

    Egad! Eileen! Yer poor blog! I killed it!

  10. episcopalifem permalink*
    October 7, 2007 5:07 pm

    nah – ye havna killed it. It wouldna die tha easily…

    I like Thicht Nhat Nahn – his writings are mellowing.

    I also have the Teresa of Avila book on my shelf, waiting to be read.

    I actually have an Ayn Rand book on my Amazon Wish List – Anthem, I think. So I’m definitely interested in reading her.

    I like snooty literature AND other literature. That’s what makes the world go round, right?

  11. October 7, 2007 7:41 pm

    Oh sure, I read all kinds of stuff, especially disrespectable stuff.

  12. October 7, 2007 7:45 pm

    Oh, and it’s Thich (“Venerable”) Nhat Hanh, or Thua Ong, Thua Thich, “van van” (“etc.”). Forgive me, my dear fluffie; I’m a severely frustrated professor and preacher, currently unused.

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