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Following up on yesterday’s fat rant

September 27, 2007

Here is a link to a blog called The Rotund. The Rotund has a picture up of herself, and would like us to guess her height and weight.

This little experiment is to demonstrate that folks are very inaccurate in their ability to judge height and weight.

Makes eyewitness testimony a little scary too, when you think about it. We are probably better at recalling shape – short, tall, think, chunky, really fat, etc.

Go take a guess. She is going to reveal in a while.

Meanwhile, Kate has up a post pointing out an article by Sally Ann Voak, a bemoaning diet book author in the UK who has realized that most of her slimmed down successes plump up and become fatties again – and she can’t figure out why. Fat people cannot possibly be happy – not even attractive, successful fat people like Dawn French.

Melissa over at Shakesville has something to say about that too, especially as she is a dead ringer for Dawn French.

Makes for some interesting reading. Melissa has definitely got GIRL POWER, and a killer ass, according to her husband, and he should know.

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5 Comments leave one →
  1. September 27, 2007 2:27 pm

    *sigh* Men have fat issues too. Unspoken, but there.

  2. September 27, 2007 2:40 pm

    I loved Melissa’s rant! 😀 and a pox on Sally Voak’s snotty attitude…

  3. September 27, 2007 2:45 pm

    (((Pisco)))) I know.

    I have the impression, though, that men who feel they are fat are more concerned with the fact that they themselves feel fat, rather than that they are perceived as fat by other men or women. OCIBW…, and, this could be totally untrue among gay men, who may feel very pressured to look a certain way.

    It would be interesting to research the differences between how hetero and homosexual men feel about being over weight, and how they perceive other overweight men.

    Most women I know are obsessed with their weight, even when they are within “healthy” ranges. And we definitely want to know if we “look fat in this”. Men don’t seem to do that (or at least they don’t articulate it the way women do.)

    One of the funniest commercials I ever saw was of a man trying on a pair of pants, and asking another guy if the pants made his butt look big. It was funny simply because that’s not something men normally do, but women do all the time. (I think it was a light beer commercial).

    Anyway – weight is an issue. And, unless it is negatively impacting your health, it should just be a number.

  4. September 27, 2007 3:25 pm

    Oh dear, I could write volumes on this (but I will try to forbear, not to worry). I’ve got a family history of obsession about weight past the point of madness (even now my mother at 84 starves herself because her congestive heart condition makes her bloated and says her borderline diabetes is “punishment” for having eaten too much all her life, and the lack of nourishment and liquids leaves her confused — then there was her crash diet many years ago, getting injections of placenta tissue or something from Dr. Turow — yes, the lawyer-author Scott Turow’s father, probably now deceased, who was an oby-gyn doctor who had a bullwhip hanging over his desk in his office as some kind of implied threat to pregnant and other women who didn’t keep their weight down). But stories about my mom and her mom would take down the wordpress server.

    So let me just add my brief confession of an experience I consider pretty bizarre for a presumably intelligent, successful, professional woman such as myself. My first involvement in an online community was on the original Fat Flush (Ann Louise Gittleman) diet forum at ivillage.com, where I eventually became a moderator. I lost 65 lbs. in about six months, got to go to the Greenhouse (an obscenely expensive spa near Dallas) for only airfare and a few perks, and got a discount on one of the first Fat Flush cruises. I met Ann Louise several times, worked for her on the cruise, and, although she is a much kinder, more knowledgeable person than that Sally person, I must say that she doesn’t get *it* at all because she has never been overweight her entire life (she’s tall — something like 5 9 — and she only started changing her eating habits to deal with physical and mental health issues). Nor do most of those people (with a few exceptions) who still work for her online and elsewhere, mostly for no compensation. For them it’s a purist, all will-power thing, the complexities, biological and psychological, of eating for “comfort” are beyond them (even if some of the science is actually in ALG’s writings), and, of course, the not too hidden message is that one cannot be happy without being thin. That goes not only for those of us beginning at 200 something, but also for the young figure skater who bloated from something like 100 to 115 or 20 pounds when she “retired” from skating. Geez. The funny thing was that most of the “regulars” on the new, commercial online forum set up later were die-hard, political right-wingers, and many fundgeicals. [Did you happen to catch the SF blog where Melanie “joked” about Ponzer giving him a hard time for grabbing donuts, etc. and defiling his body with too much sugar?]

    More to this story, but, as you can guess, I gained the weight back, slowly over the next two years, beginning with the Fat Flush cruise, during which my unrepentently overweight husband used to hang out at the central bar sipping martinis with the really nice gay couple, one of whom was the travel agent who organized the group — and I started joining them. I just wasn’t going to diet through my “vacation” — and then began the sneaking food so other FF participants wouldn’t see me, the poster-woman, doing it. And then I couldn’t keep up the schedule of working out, buying, cleaning and cooking veggies, and all the hassle of keeping with the diet, while still trying work and spend time with my husband (who recreates by sitting and watching t.v. and going out to restaurants — the man who from the beginning said he didn’t care how much I weighed as long as I quit smoking — which I did — and insists on buying me anything I want off restaurant menus — my mother and ex-husband would never get me near an appetizer, let alone a dessert). And although it preceded the cruise, the point at which I lost faith in The Diet was at the Greenhouse, where we all literally starved, being forced to live on a Phase 1 menu with no access to the kitchen for extra veggies, etc. and I was the Only One of the group who lost not an ounce over 4-5 days. I looked in the mirror, looked at the much slimmer me in tights, but with the sagging underarms, the 50 something face, and thought — WTF, what am I trying to prove here? So now, although I’d like to find time to exercise more, lose some of it, I’ve succumbed to being just “me,” let the hair go entirely gray, and… well, the OCICBINY crowd will see the results, I’m afraid.

    Thank goodness for my daughter who has, so far, escaped the insanity. She’s now around 5 7 and 110 lbs — a bit too thin but she eats small meals all day long and thinks her friends are crazy for eating nothing all day (these high school girls sit and pick at nothing but lettuce for lunch and drink coffee). Meanwhile, when we visited my son’s college orientation, we were told that girls needed far less meals/money on the meal plan (apparently because they skip a lot of meals). It’s a crazy, crazy world out there.

    Me, I just want clothes that fit and to keep being able to take long walks. *sigh* (and this WAS the short version — sorry Eileen). Someday when I can pull it together, I should write something about what I’ve learned after a life-time of dieting (and watching my mother diet) and all I’ve read and heard from the so-called experts. But for now……

  5. episcopalifem permalink*
    September 27, 2007 4:40 pm

    Yep Kathy. I know what you mean about the time thing.

    In order to stay thin, I have to work out 50-60 mins weights and aerobics 3-5/week.

    I don’t have that kind of time at the moment, and I lost all my weight when I was working part time.

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